WORLD FIRST US-AUSTRALIA BIOFUEL FLIGHT TAKES OFF

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SYDNEY, 29TH JANUARY 2018 

The historic trans-Pacific 15 hour flight will operate with approximately 24,000kg of blended biofuel, saving 18,000kg in carbon emissions.

Qantas will use biofuel processed from Brassica Carinata, a non-food, industrial type of mustard seed, developed by Canadian-based agricultural-technology company, Agrisoma Biosciences (Agrisoma).

The flight is part of the partnership announced in 2017 which will also see the companies work with Australian farmers to grow the country’s first commercial aviation biofuel seed crop by 2020.

Qantas International CEO Alison Webster said it was fitting that the airline’s game-changing Dreamliner 787-9 will showcase the future of sustainable aviation.

“The Qantas Dreamliner marks an exciting new era of innovation and travel. The aircraft is more fuel efficient and generates fewer greenhouse emissions than similarly sized-aircraft and today’s flight will see a further reduction on this route.

“Our partnership with Agrisoma marks a big step in the development of a renewable jetfuel industry in Australia – it is a project we are really proud to be part of as we look at ways to reduce carbon emissions across our operations.”

Across its lifecycle, using Carinata-derived biofuel can reduce carbon emissions by eighty percent compared to traditional jet fuel.

The ten percent biofuel blend used on today’s flight will therefore see a seven percent reduction in emissions on this route compared to normal operations.

Carinita requires no specialised production or processing techniques. It is water efficient and The University of Queensland field trials in Gatton, Queensland, and in Bordertown, South Australia, have demonstrated it should do very well in the Australian climate.

It is sown in either fallow areas where food crops fail or in between regular crop cycles, known as “cover cropping”.  Rotational or break-crops can improve soil quality, reduce erosion for food crops and provide farmers with additional income.

Agrisoma CEO, Steve Fabijanski, said biofuel produced from Carinata provides wide ranging benefits.

“Biojet fuel made from Carinata delivers both oil for biofuel and protein for animal nutrition while also enhancing the soil its grown in.

“We are excited about the potential of the crop in Australia and look forward to working with local farmers and Qantas to develop a clean energy source for the local aviation industry.”

Qantas’ first trans-Pacific biofuel flight was made possible with the support of AltAir Fuels and World Fuel Services.

QF96 will depart LAX on Sunday, 28th January and arrive in Melbourne on 30th January (local time).

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Carinata seed

FACTS:

Carinata

  • Carinata produces high quality oil, ideal for aviation biofuel, bio-jet for aircraft and bio-diesel for airport vehicles. It is a ‘drop-in’ crop and requires no specialised production or processing techniques.
  • It is sown in either fallow areas where food crops fail or in between regular crop cycles, known as “cover cropping”. Rotational or break-crops improvessoil quality, reduces erosion for food crops and provides farmers with additional annual income.
  • Carinata-based fuel offers a more than 80 per cent reduction in carbon emissions in comparison to standard petroleum based fuel.[1] (opens in new window)
  • The crushed Carinata seed produces a high-quality, high-protein, non-GMO meal for the Australian livestock, dairy and poultry market.
  • One hectare of Carinata seed yields 2,000 litres of oil, which produces 400 litres of biofuel, 1,400 litres of renewable diesel and 10% renewable by-products.

Other ways Qantas is reducing carbon emissions across its operations

  • The 787 uses up to 20 per cent less fuel than other traditional aircraft of its size. Over the next two years Qantas’ Dreamliners will be replacing some of the the older 747 aircraft in its fleet.
  • Across its network, Qantas is creating more efficient flight paths based on factors such as forecast winds and employs Dynamic Airborne Reroute Procedures (DARP) which allows for multiple inflight adjustments to the flight path based on updated meteorological conditions.
  • Qantas Pilots are using a world first flight data application, FlightPulse, which provides industry leading access to the efficiency of their flights and helps them fly more efficiently.
  • In 2007, we introduced the Qantas Future Planet program, which, together with our passengers, has offset more than 3.0 million tonnes of carbon emissions, making the Qantas carbon offset program the world’s largest airline offset program.

Source: Quantas

Fly Green Day

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Gevo: ‘Fly Green Day’ at Chicago O’Hare

Inspiring Airlines to use lower carbon fuels

 
Englewood, Colorado, November 08, 2017: Gevo announced that its alcohol-to-jet fuel (ATJ) derived from renewable isobutanol is being used today by eight commercial airlines for the ‘Fly Green Day’, sponsored by the O’Hare Fuel Committee, at Chicago O’Hare International Airport.  This event is the first time renewable jet fuel has been supplied at Chicago O’Hare using the existing airport fueling infrastructure, such as pipelines, terminals and tankage.
Commercial airlines participating in the ‘Fly Green Day’ are Lufthansa, United Airlines, Etihad, Cathay Pacific Airways, Emirates, Japan Airlines, Korean Air, Atlas Air and FedEx. “This is the first time we have supplied our customers with biojet produced from alcohol and demonstrates how we are working with multiple suppliers to build a leadership position in this area,” said Air BP’s Chief Executive Officer Jon Platt. “We anticipate that through this promotion we will inspire more of our customers to use lower carbon fuels.”
To date, airlines and airports have generally relied on alternative means of supplying renewable jet fuel to the wing, usually trucking jet fuel on site for blending and fueling. For today’s ‘Fly Green Day’, Air BP blended Gevo’s ATJ with regular fossil-based Jet A fuel, certified its quality and then supplied its customers through the airport’s main fuel hydrant system.
 “We are excited to be a part of this project. This is the next stage in development of our goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and move forward with the full commercial deployment of renewable jet fuel,” said Thorsten Luft, Vice President Corporate Fuel for Lufthansa AG.
Gevo is a renewable technology, chemical products, and next generation biofuels company focused on the production of isobutanol, as well as related products from renewable feedstocks.

Source: Gevo

Neste: Business Environment Outlook Published

Climate Change Sustainable Aviation

‘Taking Action on Climate Change’ examines changes in energy and transport markets

 
Keilaranta, October 5, 2017: Neste has published a business environment outlook called Taking Action on Climate Change. It discusses key changes taking place in the energy, transport and chemicals markets. As global commitment to tackle climate change requires major efforts to reduce emissions, the use of fossil raw materials will inevitably need to decline in all of these sectors. Neste has risen to become the global leader in renewable diesel, and realizes that there is significant potential for renewable solutions not only in the road transport sector but also in aviation and the plastics industries.
 
Electric vehicles are on the way – what is Neste’s response?
Neste estimates that by 2030, approximately ten percent of the global car fleet will be electric cars. Despite the fact that electric vehicles are expected to rapidly become more common for passenger transport, Neste believes that renewable diesel will remain a competitive solution for reducing transport emissions. By 2021, renewable diesel demand is expected to have doubled in North America, the Nordic countries and Europe.
“The increase of electric cars is a good thing, because we need every possible solution to combat climate change,” says Neste’s President & CEO, Matti Lievonen. “Renewable diesel is also needed, since for the time being it’s one of the most cost-efficient ways to reduce climate emissions, and can do so by as much as 90 percent. Many cities and businesses in Finland, Sweden and also in California have opted for 100 percent Neste MY Renewable Diesel for this reason.”
To achieve Finland’s planned 50 percent emission reduction target by 2030, both biofuels and electric vehicles using emission-free power will be needed in abundance.
 
What is the future of diesel vehicles and diesel fuel?
Some major cities have announced bans or restrictions on diesel vehicles to tackle air quality problems. Due to emissions cheating, the reputation of diesel cars has suffered greatly. Neste believes that the problem of emissions from diesel vehicles can be solved, and that diesel technology will remain competitive for a long time to come.
“Engine standards are evolving, and the automotive industry is committed to important measures to achieve significantly lower tailpipe emissions. One of the ways to further reduce the heavy traffic emissions is to choose 100% biofuels, such as Neste MY Renewable Diesel,” says Lievonen.
In Europe, demand for diesel and other fuels that are classified as middle distillates is expected to grow by more than 10 million tons by 2025. One part of this growth is being driven by the increase in demand for heavy transportation and air traffic. About 70 percent of diesel use is accounted for by heavy transportation.
In the coming years, demand for middle distillates, like diesel, will also increase significantly in shipping, where the IMO’s (International Maritime Organization) global sulfur regulation, which comes into force in 2020, will limit the sulfur content in marine fuels to below 0.5 percent. This means that much of the shipping industry will switch from heavy fuel oil to low-sulfur marine fuels. Neste offers ship owners low-sulfur marine fuels that meet the new emission limits.
 
Renewable solutions for air traffic are on the way
The aviation industry, which consumes rapidly growing volumes of fuel, is also opening up to renewable jet fuels. Legislation to support this change is being developed in several regions, including the EU, Norway, and California. 
“Renewable fuels are seen as an important solution for reducing emissions from air transport. Solutions are needed because at the same time as the aviation industry is committed to reducing its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, demand for aviation fuel is projected to grow globally by 100 million tons over the next ten years,” says Lievonen.
Neste is a global pioneer in renewable air transport solutions, as the Neste Green Hub solution that the company has developed promotes the use of renewable aviation fuel with the aid of airport cooperation. The first example of this is the recently announced cooperation with Geneva Airport, and discussions are also ongoing on ten other cooperation projects.
 
First commercial delivery of bioplastics in 2018
Neste is also developing new business operations from bioplastics, the raw materials for which are the renewable products manufactured by Neste. The bioplastics market is expected to grow by more than 40 percent by 2021. About 80 percent of this growth is expected to come from durable biobased plastics, such as Neste’s bioplastics solution, the demand for which is growing faster than for biodegradable plastics. Neste’s bioplastic solution is easy to use, because the properties of the plastics produced are exactly the same in production, use and recycling.
“Our renewable products have already been used in bioplastics production, and our goal is to make the first commercial delivery in the first half of 2018. We are working closely with our customers and plastic manufacturers, and discussions are underway with ten global brands,” says Lievonen.
By 2020, Neste targets to have 20% of its renewable business sales volume from renewable jet fuel, renewable chemicals and bio-based plastics.
Climate Change Sustainable Aviation
 
Source: Neste Corporation

Air BP: Reducing Carbon Emissions in Bergen

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Third Scandinavian biojet-supplied location announced

Bergen, Norway, August 21, 2017: The international aviation fuel products and service supplier Air BP is now offering commercial jet biofuel (biojet) to customers at Bergen airport in Norway (BGO/ENBR). The first batch was delivered to the airport on August 16.

This follows Air BP’s successful introduction of biojet at Halmstad airport in Sweden in June 2017 and at Oslo airport in Norway in January 2016. As with Oslo, Air BP has worked with Norwegian airport operator Avinor to make this latest development possible.

Air BP has also supplied airlines on an ad-hoc basis at airports including Stockholm Arlanda (ARN/ESSA), Stockholm Bromma (BMA/ESSB), Karlstad (KSD/ESOK) and Göteborg Landvetter (GOT/ESGG).

Commenting on the announcement, Thorbjorn Larsson, general manager Air BP Nordics, said: “We are excited to help make the supply of biojet commercially available and accessible to our customers in Bergen, our third airport in Scandinavia. The aviation industry has ambitious targets to reduce its carbon emissions and we are proud to be working together with our customers to increase the use of biojet.”

Aslak Sverdrup, Bergen airport director, commented: “With the aviation industry’s ongoing commitment to protecting the environment, we are very pleased to collaborate with Air BP on the introduction of biojet at Bergen. As with Oslo, we hope to inspire other airports to follow suit so we can all work towards the desired lower carbon future.”

Air BP continues to support its customers in the use and adoption of biofuels and in achieving their carbon reduction goals (CO2). Air BP was the first aviation fuel supplier to be independently certified carbon neutral for into-plane fueling operations at 250 Air BP locations in October 2016. Air BP announced an investment of $30 million in biojet producer Fulcrum BioEnergy in November 2016 with the aim of distributing and supplying biojet into aircraft at key hubs across North America to meet growing demand.

Source: Air BP

SEA-TAC Moves Closer to Funding Aviation Biofuels

Making biofuel available, cost-effective and practical for all airlines at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Seattle, July 19, 2017: Carbon reduction leaders Carbon War Room (CWR) and SkyNRG join with the Port of Seattle to announce recommendations for long-term funding mechanisms that could supply all airlines at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (Sea-Tac) with sustainable aviation biofuels.

The results are outlined in a study that reviews a broad spectrum of airport funding sources to cover the higher cost of biofuel, as well as biofuel supply chain infrastructure investments. The study, published today, was conducted by CWR and SkyNRG, in partnership with the Port.

“The information contained in this study will help us take the next steps toward our goal of making biofuel available, cost-effective and practical for all airlines at Sea-Tac,” said Port of Seattle Commissioner John Creighton. “It wouldn’t have been possible to get to this point without the momentum provided by our partners, industry leaders and community innovators.”

The two biggest challenges facing broader adoption of sustainable aviation fuel at Sea-Tac are the higher cost compared with petroleum jet fuel, and the constraints imposed by state and federal regulations on use of airport funds.
The report, titled ‘Innovative Funding for Sustainable Aviation Fuel at U.S. Airports: Explored at Seattle-Tacoma International’, reveals the financial tools available to U.S. airports, and outlines legal constraints and financial impacts of each tool. The report found that no single tool could generate enough funding to cover the higher cost of biofuel, and recommended combining a number of funding tools.

“Until we reach fossil-price parity, we need co-funding mechanism to close the price gap between conventional jet fuel and sustainable aviation biofuels. Sea-Tac demonstrates that airports can play a key role in helping find the right partners to cover the premium and accelerate the transition to secure a sustainable future for the aviation industry,” said Theye Veen, Chief Financial Officer of SkyNRG.

“We congratulate Sea-Tac on its leadership in showing that airport authorities are critical to the success of the aviation biofuel industry,” said Adam Klauber, Director of CWR’s Sustainable Aviation program. “We’ve proven that there are viable funding mechanisms for the widespread uptake of sustainable aviation fuel at Sea-Tac, and we hope that the study provides tools and ideas for other ambitious airports to consider in their sustainability initiatives.”

AltAir Fuels, based in California, is regularly producing aviation biofuels.  The Port, as an economic development engine, is seeking ways to help grow the market.  This initiative is one solution in the Port’s quest to find sustainable solutions that improve the health of our environment and community.  Other Port successes include emissions reduction achieved by providing pre-heated and cooled air to aircraft parked at gates, use of electric ground support equipment, and conversion to green vehicles.

For further information, please download the report here.

About Seattle-Tacoma International Airport: Operated by the Port of Seattle, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA, KSEA) is ranked as the ninth busiest U.S. airport, serving nearly 45.7 million passengers and more than 366,000 metric tons of air cargo in 2016. With a regional economic impact of more than $16.3 billion in business revenue, Sea-Tac generates 171,796 jobs (109,924 direct jobs) representing over $2.8 billion in direct earnings and more than $565 million in state and local taxes. Twenty-four airlines serve 81 non-stop domestic and 24 international destinations.

About Carbon War Room: Carbon War Room (CWR) was founded in 2009 as a global nonprofit organization by Sir Richard Branson and a group of like-minded entrepreneurs. It intervenes in markets to accelerate the adoption of business solutions that reduce carbon emissions at gigaton scale. In 2014, CWR merged with and now operates as part of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). RMI engages businesses, communities, institutions, and entrepreneurs to transform global energy use to create a clean, prosperous, and secure low-carbon future. RMI has offices in Basalt and Boulder, Colorado; New York City; Washington, D.C.; and Beijing.

About SkyNRG: SkyNRG is the global market leader for sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), having supplied over 25 airlines on all continents worldwide. SkyNRG sources, blends and distributes SAF, guarantees sustainability throughout the supply chain and helps to co-fund the premium. At the same time, SkyNRG focuses on developing regional supply chains that offer a real sustainable and affordable alternative to fossil fuels. SkyNRG has its operations RSB certified and is structurally advised by an independent Sustainability Board in which WWF International, European Climate Foundation, University of Groningen and Solidaridad Network hold a seat.

SEA-TAC

Airbus A330 of Thomas Cook Airlines taking-off at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on the way to Manchester. Photo: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Source: Port of Seattle

ATR and Sweden’s BRA Perform First ATR Biofuel Flight 

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Biofuels from different types of wood could make domestic air traffic in Sweden completely fossil-free

Stockholm, February 1, 2017: An ATR 72-600 of the Swedish carrier BRA (former Braathens Regional) took off from Stockholm-Bromma today to Umeå fueled at 45% with fossil-free used cooking oil, marking the first biofuel-powered flight of an ATR aircraft.

BRA provides an essential air service to link their main hub of Stockholm-Bromma to twelve Swedish regions. The ATRs of BRA provide an unrivaled performance advantage in months with adverse weather conditions. The airline is particularly committed to environmental preservation and has already started replacing their Saab 2000s with modern ATR 72-600s, recognized as the most fuel-efficient aircraft on the regional market.

Several research and development initiatives are currently underway in Sweden to produce biofuels from different types of wood. In Sweden, forests cover more than 50% of the country, and grow at a rate of 120 million cubic meters annually. Making domestic air traffic in Sweden completely fossil-free would require less than 2% of the total annual forest growth.

Thanks to its lighter structure, optimized speed and engines designed for short routes, ATR aircraft already demonstrate the best environmental performance in its segment. Nonetheless, ATR continues to invest in virtuous technologies and contributes to European research and development efforts to take advances in environmental performance even further. ATR encourages the use of alternative fuels and offers support to customers and local governments in developing a comprehensive business plan, from fuel selection to routing, certification and availability for seamless airline operations.

Christian Clemens, Chief Executive Officer of BRA, said: “Sweden is currently debating a new tax on aviation. It will have a minimal impact on emissions, and will unfortunately slow down the pace in which we can continue to make aviation more sustainable. The ATR 72-600, especially if powered by biofuel, is the optimal transportation on many of our routes and features the highest standards of environmental care.”

Christian Scherer, CEO of ATR, declared: “Today’s challenge is to get a large-scale production of biofuels at affordable costs while avoiding a negative impact on the environment. Swedish airlines like BRA can take advantage of the massive expansion of its forests, along with the operation of fuel-efficient turboprops, to reach the ambitious goal of halving their CO2 emissions by 2025.”

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An ATR 72-600 of the Swedish carrier BRA fueled at 45% with fossil-free used cooking oil

BRA’s operating hub is Stockholm-Bromma Airport, the airport nearest downtown Stockholm. The airline carries a third of the domestic passengers in Sweden.

Source: ATR

United Airlines Honored as ‘Eco-Airline of the Year’

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Highest recognition from ‘Air Transport World’ magazine for its leadership in environmental action

Chicago, January 24, 2017: For the second time since launching its industry-leading Eco-Skies program, United Airlines was named the Eco-Airline of the Year by Air Transport World (ATW) magazine. The award recognizes an airline in global commercial aviation for its environmental leadership as demonstrated by consistent and impactful environmental action within the company and in the industry. The magazine awarded United with the top honor for multiple initiatives in 2016 and prior years, including becoming the first U.S. airline to begin using commercial-scale volumes of sustainable aviation biofuel for regularly scheduled flights, marking a significant milestone in the industry by moving beyond demonstrations and test programs to the use of low-carbon biofuels for ongoing operations.

“Innovation and sustainability are twin engines that drive our progress as the most environmentally conscious airline in the world,” said Oscar Munoz, United’s chief executive officer. “From pioneering investments in biofuels to increasing efficiency and reducing waste to supporting a single global market based measure for carbon emissions, United is committed to innovating solutions that we hope will become the expectation for our industry, not the exception. And while we take great pride in this important recognition for our efforts, the measure of our success is the opinion of our children and grandchildren who will look back on our efforts and say that we lived up to our obligations to them in protecting the planet for future generations.”

United’s Eco-Skies program represents the company’s commitment to the environment and the actions taken every day to create a sustainable future. In addition to incorporating sustainable biofuel into its operations at Los Angeles International Airport, United’s recent environmental achievements include:

  • Investing $30 million in U.S.-based alternative aviation fuels developer Fulcrum BioEnergy, Inc., which represented the single largest investment by any airline globally in alternative fuels.
  • Becoming the first U.S. airline to repurpose items from the carrier’s international premium cabin amenity kits and partnering with Clean the World to donate hygiene products to those in critical need.
  • Partnering with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to demonstrate the potential benefits of new satellite-based technology for instrument landings that enable aircraft to use fuel more efficiently on arrival and land at normal rates in challenging weather.
  • Continuing to replace its eligible ground equipment and service vehicles with cleaner, electrically powered alternatives, with 47 percent of the fleet converted to date.
  • Becoming the first airline to fly with Boeing’s Split Scimitar winglets, which reduce fuel consumption by up to 2 percent; United is the largest Split Scimitar winglet customer today.
  • Being the only U.S.-based airline named to the Carbon Disclosure Project’s “Leadership” category for its environmental disclosure, with an A- Climate score in 2016.
  • Sourcing illy coffee’s internationally certified supply chain of farmers who earn above-market prices in exchange for meeting quality and sustainability standards for the finest coffee.
  • Offering Eco-Skies CarbonChoice, the airline industry’s only integrated carbon offset program for corporate business travel and cargo shipments.

Additionally, as part of United’s commitment to operating an environmentally friendly and responsible airline, the carrier added a carbon footprint measurement to its 2017 Global Performance Commitment. United is committing to achieving a lower gross carbon footprint than its two largest U.S.-based competitors this year, as measured by carbon dioxide-equivalent per available seat-mile. If United does not meet the goals of its 2017 Global Performance Commitment, the airline will compensate eligible corporate accounts.

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Equipped with new LEAP-1B engines from CFM International and improvements such as the Advanced Technology Winglet, the 737MAX reduces fuel burn and CO2 emissions by 13 percent

For more information on United’s Eco-Skies commitment to the environment, visit www.united.com/ecoskies.

Source: United Airlines

SkyNRG, Fly Green Fund and Swedavia Enable Sustainable Aviation Fuel Flights from Stockholm

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Growing the sustainable aviation market in the Nordics

Stockholm, Arlanda Airport, January 3, 2017:  Just before New Year’s Eve, Swedavia received its first sustainable aviation fuel at Stockholm Arlanda Airport. It marks the start of deliveries of sustainable aviation fuel through the Fly Green Fund and demonstrates Swedavia’s commitment to sustainable aviation. The fuel is supplied by SkyNRG together with AirBP.

Fly Green Fund

Fly Green Fund is the first of its kind in the world and enables organizations and individuals in the Nordics to reduce their carbon footprint, by flying on sustainable aviation fuel. Swedavia joined Fly Green Fund as launching partner two years ago and also became a corporate customer of Fly Green Fund. Swedavia is the first corporate in the world buying sustainable aviation fuel for all their business flights through Fly Green Fund. “We at Swedavia want to lead the way and help increase the demand for aviation biofuel,” says Lena Wennberg, Director Environment for Swedavia.

Sustainable Aviation Fuel

“It is a milestone in many ways for Fly Green Fund and our partners today. By buying sustainable aviation fuel for their staff flights, Swedavia reduces its own carbon foot print and contributes to developing a sustainable future for aviation.  Other corporate customers like Löfbergs, Resia and our Swish-customers have contributed as well. We are grateful to everyone that has been part of this. It is a real joint effort and shows that together we can grow the sustainable aviation market in the Nordics. We have set an example for others to follow,” says Maria Fiskerud, Managing Director for Fly Green Fund.

SkyNRG organized the sustainable aviation fuel deliveries to Arlanda Airport for Fly Green Fund, in which now also SAS, KLM and EFS are partners.  The sustainable aviation fuel is produced by bio refinery AltAir Fuels in the US and supplied by SkyNRG and AirBP via the common fuel infrastructure running to and at the airport.

“It is great to see that so much is happening in the Nordics. After founding the Fly Green Fund two years ago and after a lot of ground work, this is a huge result thanks to Swedavia. It is a good example that airports are perfectly positioned to support the development of sustainable aviation fuels,” says Theye Veen, CFO for SkyNRG.

For further information please visit: www.skynrg.comwww.flygreenfund.se,www.swedavia.se

Source: SkyNRG

Neste Wins Industry Leader Biofuels Award

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Global Energy Awards: Neste Wins Industry Leader Biofuels Award 2016 

Keilaranta, Finland, December 22, 2016: Neste was selected as the leading biofueloperator at the 2016 Global Energy Awards. The company came first in the Industry Leader Award Biofuels category in the competition arranged by S&P Platts, a provider of market information and research in the energy sector.

In the Industry Leader Award Biofuels category, all finalists were innovative actors developing sustainable biofuel solutions. The panel of judges was impressed by NEXBTL technology, which enables the production of top-quality renewable diesel and other renewable products from nearly any waste fat or vegetable oil through a hydrogen-based treatment. The panel was also particularly inspired by the company’s plans to start production of renewable propane at its Rotterdam refinery by the end of 2016. In this category, the winner was picked from a total of seven finalists.

Neste won praise for its commitment to sustainability and for its continuous search for new solutions so that it can develop its operations. The company’s plans to increase biodiesel production capacity beyond the current annual volume of two million tons were characterized by the judges as a pioneering venture, and the panel estimated that this will have an impact on global energy markets now and in the future.

Source: Neste Corporation

Alaska Airlines Flies First Commercial Flight with New Biofuel Made from Forest Residuals

New industry of woody biomass collection and conversion may help to create jobs in rural economies

Seattle, Washington, November 14, 2016: Alaska Airlines made history flying the world’s first commercial flight using a new sustainable alternativejet fuel made from forest residuals from the Pacific Northwest – the limbs, stumps and branches that are left over after a timber harvest or forest thinning of managed forests on private land.

The flight departed in the morning from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C., powered by a 20 percent blend of the new, sustainable biofuel sourced directly from the Pacific Northwest.

The fuel for today’s flight was produced by the Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA), led Washington State University. NARA is a five-year initiative that unites 32 member organizations from the academia, aviation, private industry, and the government, that came together under a USDA grant to demonstrate the viability of producing alternative jet fuel from forest residuals.

Gevo, Inc., a NARA partner, successfully adapted its patented technologies to convert cellulosic sugars derived from wood waste into renewable isobutanol, which was then further converted into Gevo’s Alcohol-to-Jet (ATJ) fuel. Believed to be the world’s first alternative jet fuel produced from wood, the fuel meets international ASTM standards, allowing it to be used safely for commercial flights.

New Biofuel

While traditional forest practices leave some of the harvest materials behind to replenish soil nutrients and provide cover, the excess forest biomass is usually piled and burned. The biofuel used in this flight was made from excess forest residuals collected from both sustainably managed forests owned by Weyerhaeuser (OR), the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe (WA), and the Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes (MT), as well as rejected wood fibers from Cosmo Specialty Fibers (WA).

Using forest residuals for biofuel feedstock is exciting because

  • it does not compete with food production,
  • air pollution is cut by reducing slash pile burning,
  • removal of residuals prepares the forest floor for replanting,
  • the new industry of woody biomass collection and conversion helps create jobs in rural economies and
  • forest residuals are abundant and can be sustainably supplied from private lands.

Sustainable alternative jet fuels reduce greenhouse gas emission by 50-80 percent over the lifecycle of the fuel- from growth of the feedstock, transportation to a processing facility and production. The actual emission reduction depends on the type of feedstock used. A flight with a 20 percent blend of biofuel made from forest residuals will emit approximately 70 percent less CO2 than conventional petroleum jet.

Alaska Airlines Flies First Commercial Flight with New Biofuel Made from Forest Residuals

Alaska Airlines made history flying the world’s first commercial flight using a new sustainable alternative jet fuel made from forest residuals

Alaska Airlines flew already two more flights in June using a blend of biofuel produced from the non-edible portion of sustainable corn.

Source: Alaska Airlines

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